Laughing Boy

The Drink

Rum remains the drink to warm, cool or restore a man. But don’t refer to Bacardi as Rum in my presence–it ain’t.

DISSOLVE HALF A TEASPOONFUL OF SUGAR IN A DASH OF ANGOSTURA BITTERS, ADD 1 TEASPOONFUL OF SWEET VERMOUTH, ADD CHIPPED ICE. FILL OLD-FASHIONED GLASS TO THE BRIM WITH NEW ENGLAND RUM. GARNISH WITH LEMON PEEL AND SLICES OF ORANGE (IF YOU LIKE FRUIT SALAD)

-From So Red the Nose (Caps are from the original. Back then it was ok to shout your cocktails.)

LaughingBoyI think I’m going to have to to rank these cocktails by potency at the end of this project. I mean, is it ok to call this drink strong when I’ve said the same about almost all the others? As it is right now, I feel like I risk sounding like the girl-who-cried -wolf-and-can’t-hold-her-liquor. Let’s just say that this is the only drink so far that resulted in me binge eating cottage cheese and hate-watching the Left Behind movies. Continue reading

The Voice of Bugle Ann

The Drink

Copyright Alexandra Harmon 2014

Possibly the secret of that ghostly voice of Bugle Ann ringing through the hills of Missouri is to be found in the (following) recipe. 

JUICE OF 1/2 LEMON
JUICE OF 1/2 ORANGE
2 1/2 OUNCES OF GIN

Pour Over Two Large Cubes of Ice in Tall Glass and Spray Tenderly with Seltzer from Siphon — not Bottled Soda. Don’t Stir. Drink in Thirsty Gulps. Repeat at Quick Intervals until You Begin to Bay Like a Fox Hound.

-From So Red the Nose

I love this drink for giving me an excuse to buy my new favorite bar toy: the old fashioned seltzer bottle — aka the soda siphon/syphon. Seriously, I cuddle this thing to sleep every night. Continue reading

The Canary Murder Case

The Drink 

Canary

This cocktail was ‘Fiendishly plotted, with murder in mind’

1/2 JIGGER DRY GIN
1/2 JIGGER COGNAC
1/2 JIGGER YELLOW VERMOUTH
1 JIGGER ORANGE JUICE
1 DASH ORANGE BITTERS
Shake Well

-From So Red the Nose

So Red the Nose was published only two short years after Prohibition ended. So when you see the word “cocktail” in this blog, start getting used to thinking long-island ice tea over strawberry daiquiri. My first attempt at a 1930’s cocktail tastes more like a shot with a little orange flavoring, and you can see that the ingredients list tips more toward liquor than mixer. You will either need to nurse this drink over several chapters, or risk misreading “apathetically,” spending several minutes puzzling over how the main character could “admit” something “alphabetically.” Not that I would know anything about that. Continue reading