Geneva

Flaming_cocktails

      …if a few of our more robust clergymen are genuinely anxious to forward the cause of world peace and at the same time would like to tell their audiences how to bring good cheer into the home on Christmas Day, we suggest as a theme for a sermon Robert J. Casey’s unusual program for bringing about international good will.
Call Gin by it’s right name!
White distillations of corn, rye, barley or malt are made in almost every country on the face of the earth. They may vary slightly in composition but they seldom vary in spirit. The juniper berry is not universal, but Gin under a universal name might make all men brothers.
In fact the original name for Gin was Geneva, and it still goes under that name in Holland.
Here’s to Geneva and the spirits of peace.

— from So Red the Nose

As if 1930’s readers needed the holiday season or articles of war as an excuse to consume yet more gin. Although — regardless of what our old friend Casey might say — the juniper-based Dutch gin (also called jenever/genever) is technically not a gin as we know it, but rather the patriarch from whence all modern gins are spawned.  Continue reading

Advertisements

The Bright Land

The Drink

IMG_0495

…”known in alien times as Alexandre, but in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, as the Diary State, now rechristened for the purposes of this book the Bright Land.” After drinking it, any land looks brighter.

1 1/4 BEAKERS OF GIN
1/2 BEAKER OF CREAM
3/16 BEAKER OF CREME DE CACOA
1/16 BEAKER OF STRONG BLACK COFEE
SMALL AMOUNT OF SUGAR SYRUP

– from So Red the Nose

Yeah, I’ve never, ever heard of an “Alexander” cocktail before, but it seems to be a very similar flavor combination as a white Russian. Which is the same as saying that the Alexander/Bright Land is delicious. Send ALL the 1930’s cream-based drinks this way. Continue reading